What is the difference between seals and sea lions

what is the difference between seals and sea lions

What Is The Difference Between Seals and Sea Lions?

While baby walruses are referred to as calves, for both the seal and the sea lion, youngsters are known as pups. The Sea Lion vs. The (Fur) Seal. It is here that most similarities end, but while the species are different, it can be tough to tell the seal (particularly the fur seal) and the sea lion apart at first glance. The biggest difference. Before you come and meet our sea lions in person for a Sea Lion Encounter at the Blue Lagoon Island, learn some facts about what makes them unique and different compared to seals. 1. Ears. The most notable difference between Seals and Sea Lions are the types of ears they have. Sea lions have earflaps laying over their ear canal.

But is your summertime personality more like that of a sea lionor a seal? All pinnipeds divide their time between the beach and the ocean. Sea lions are a part of the How to find the beats per minute of a song family, which probably descended from a bear-like betwern seals are a swa of the Phocidae family, whose descendants were more of the weasel type.

FEET: Seals have small and stubby flipper-feet that are covered with a thin layer of webbing. Each of their small toes has a little claw on it. EARS: Sea lions have small flaps for ears; seals have no external ears at all, just little holes on each side of their head.

They love to bark and bellow and growl and roar. Seals are much quieter, usually vocalizing in what is gain of amplifier moans and grunts. In the water, seals what does a flexible budget performance report do by moving their back flippers side to side, like a fish tail. Sea lions swim using their front flippers as ebtween, moving them in a more up-and-down motion.

Walruses do this too—check out this crazy live walrus cam! Seals are more solitary, spending most of their time alone in the water and only coming to land once a year to mate. Home About Sign Up Archive. Type your keywords Written By. Brette Warshaw Aug 14, Here are some more fun pinniped facts, because why not: Walruses are the largest pinnipeds, with some males weighing up to 3, pounds.

They have mouths that act as a vacuum and suck up shellfish from the ocean floor. They also have air sacs in their necks that can inflate and allow them to float, like built-in life vests.

Sea lions can swim at speeds of up to miles per hour. Seals can swim up to 23 miles per hour. The average lifespan is 20 years, though some can live into their 30s. Both sea lions dirference seals have a polygynous mating system, which means there are multiple females per male. A dominant male seal will usually have three to eight females in his clan; the average male sea lion will have ten.

Seals can sleep underwater! They also can slow their heartbeat and hold their breath for long periods of time in order to conserve oxygen. So…which pinniped are you? August 6, August 20, Brette Warshaw Oct 30, Brette Warshaw Dec 11,

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What Is The Difference Between Sea Lions and Fur Seals? The first, and one of the easiest ways to tell the difference between sea lions, fur seals, and true seals, is that sea lions and fur seals have external ears that protrude from their heads. True seals, on the other hand, actually do not have an external ear and instead have ear holes. Jun 25,  · There are a lot of differences between the families but the main ones are that the Walrus have large whiskers and tusks, Eared seals have external earflaps while the True seals only have a hole. In the Eared seal family there are 2 subfamilies, the Fur seals and the Sea lions. Most of them look similar, and genetic wise they are closely related. Seal vs sea Lion vs Walrus vs Otter difference & comparison. To conclude, the article provides a comparison of the seal, sea lion, walrus, and otter with their qualities and the differences .

This lists the logos of programs or partners of NG Education which have provided or contributed the content on this page. Introduce the concept of classification. Discuss why scientists classify animals into different groups. Tell students that the science of classifying organisms into different groups is taxonomy.

Taxonomy enables scientists to make sense of the millions of kinds of living things and see how they are related. Ask students to think of an example of two animals that look similar but belong to different families.

Show them the photo gallery of harbor seals, leopard seals, and California sea lions. Distribute the worksheet and have students identify similarities. Have students compare the two drawings and list at least two features that seals and sea lions share. Discuss how these features relate to swimming in cold water. Hair, blubber, and flippers all keep animals warm in icy water.

Have students identify differences. Have students find at least two features that differ in seals and sea lions. Ask them how they would explain how to tell seals and sea lions apart to someone who has never seen either.

Possible answers: Seals do not have ear openings; sea lions do. Seals have shorter front flippers; sea lions have longer front flippers. Have students make predictions. Explain to students that seals' rear flippers extend backward; sea lions' rear flippers extend forward.

Ask students to predict which of these marine mammals could move most easily on land sea lions. Tell them they can confirm or revise their predictions as they watch a video. Watch and discuss the video.

Show students the video of leopard seals. Then ask them to compare how each animal uses its flippers on land and in water. Discuss how this movement relates to the animals' vulnerability to predators like polar bears and sharks. Have students use the National Geographic Animals site to research what California sea lions eat, where they find food, and how they eat it. Have students write a paragraph summarizing the information they find.

Seals and sea lions are both mammals. Although they feed in the sea, they surface for air. They return to land to give birth and nurse their young. Seals and sea lions share adaptations for living in the sea—including blubber, flippers, and streamlined bodies. But seals and sea lions belong to different families. An adaptation is passed from generation to generation. Female mammals produce milk to feed their offspring. The audio, illustrations, photos, and videos are credited beneath the media asset, except for promotional images, which generally link to another page that contains the media credit.

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Text on this page is printable and can be used according to our Terms of Service. Any interactives on this page can only be played while you are visiting our website. You cannot download interactives. Being at home is a great time to learn. This curated collection for learners in grades can be implemented at home with minimal supplies and includes engaging, fun, and skill-building lessons in social studies, geography, science, and more.

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Extending the Learning Have students use the National Geographic Animals site to research what California sea lions eat, where they find food, and how they eat it.

Learning Objectives Students will: explain why scientists classify animals into different groups identify the similarities and differences between seals and sea lions describe how the similarities help the animals to swim in cold water.

Teaching Approach Learning-for-use. Teaching Methods Discussions Hands-on learning Visual instruction. Resources Provided The resources are also available at the top of the page. Background Information Seals and sea lions are both mammals. Prior Knowledge None. Recommended Prior Activities None.

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