What do chemical reactions that absorb energy need to occur

what do chemical reactions that absorb energy need to occur

Why do some reactions release energy, while others absorb energy from the surroundings?

Energy and Chemical Reactions: There are many types of chemical reactions in the universe and energy is part of every one of them. Some absorb energy and some release it. Sep 04,  · Favorite Answer the reaction which absorbs energy are known as endothermic reactions.. chemical endothermic reactions need heat to be performed. In a thermochemical reaction that is endothermic.

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In a thermochemical reaction that reactiojs endothermic, the heat is placed on the reactants' side heat is necessary for and absorbed during the reaction. The heat absorbed during the chemical reaction results in a decrease in temperature of its surroundings. Ocur principle is employed in instant cold compresses ice packs which are used in first-aid. Trending News. Woman donated billions, then the scammers appeared. UFC fight ends instantly with horrific injury. Gronk sets crazy world record ahead of spring game.

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Black man shot by deputy after calling for help. What do chemical reactions that absorb energy need to occur? Thank You for your help. Answer Save. Favorite Answer.

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What Is a Chemical Reaction?

Sep 16,  · Yahoo Answers is shutting down on May 4th, (Eastern Time) and the Yahoo Answers website is now in read-only mode. There will be no changes to other Yahoo properties or services, or your Yahoo account. Apr 19,  · A chemical reaction that absorbs energy is called an endergonic reaction. This type of reaction can also be represented by a general chemical equation: () R e a c t a n t s + E n e r g y > P r o d u c t s Did you ever use a chemical cold pack like the one in the picture below?Estimated Reading Time: 6 mins. Chemical reactions always involve changes in chemical bonds Energy. Is released ot absorbed whenever chemical bonds form or are broken. What do chemical reactions that absorb energy need to occur? An energy source. Activation energy. Chemists call the energy needed to get a reaction .

These old iron chains give off a small amount of heat as they rust. The rusting of iron is a chemical process. It occurs when iron and oxygen go through a chemical reaction similar to burning, or combustion. The chemical reaction that occurs when something burns obviously gives off energy. You can feel the heat, and you may be able to see the light of flames. The rusting of iron is a much slower process, but it still gives off energy.

It's just that it releases energy so slowly you can't detect a change in temperature. A chemical reaction is a process that changes some chemical substances into others. A substance that starts a chemical reaction is called a reactant, and a substance that forms as a result of a chemical reaction is called a product. During the reaction, the reactants are used up to create the products. As this example shows, a chemical reaction involves the breaking and forming of chemical bonds.

Chemical bonds are forces that hold together the atoms of a molecule. Bonds occur when atoms share electrons. When methane burns, for example, bonds break within the methane and oxygen molecules, and new bonds form in the molecules of carbon dioxide and water. Chemical reactions can be represented by chemical equations. A chemical equation is a symbolic way of showing what happens during a chemical reaction. For example, the burning of methane can be represented by the chemical equation:. The arrow in a chemical equation separates the reactants from the products and shows the direction in which the reaction proceeds.

If the reaction could occur in the opposite direction as well, two arrows pointing in opposite directions would be used. The number 2 in front of O 2 and H 2 O shows that two oxygen molecules and two water molecules are involved in the reaction.

If just one molecule is involved, no number is placed in front of the chemical symbol. Matter rusting or burning are common examples of chemical changes. Chemical changes involve chemical reactions, in which some substances, called reactants, change at the molecular level to form new substances, called products.

All chemical reactions involve energy. However, not all chemical reactions release energy, as rusting and burning do. In some chemical reactions, energy is absorbed rather than released. A chemical reaction that releases energy is called an exergonic reaction. This type of reaction can be represented by a general chemical equation:. Besides rusting and burning, examples of exothermic reactions include chlorine combining with sodium to form table salt.

The decomposition of organic matter also releases energy because of exergonic reactions. Exergonic chemical reactions also take place in the cells of living things. In a chemical process similar to combustion, called cellular respiration, the sugar glucose is "burned" to provide cells with energy. The heat comes from all the exothermic chemical reactions taking place inside the compost as it decomposes.

A chemical reaction that absorbs energy is called an endergonic reaction. This type of reaction can also be represented by a general chemical equation:. Did you ever use a chemical cold pack like the one in the picture below?

The pack cools down because of an endergonic reaction. When a tube inside the pack is broken, it releases a chemical that reacts with water inside the pack. This reaction absorbs heat energy and quickly cools down the contents of the pack. Many other chemical processes involve endergonic reactions. For example, most cooking and baking involves the use of energy to produce chemical reactions. You can't bake a cake or cook an egg without adding heat energy.

Arguably, the most important endergonic reactions occur during photosynthesis. When plants produce sugar by photosynthesis, they take in light energy to power the necessary endergonic reactions. The sugar they produce provides plants and virtually all other living things with glucose for cellular respiration.

All chemical reactions need energy to get started. Even reactions that release energy need a boost of energy in order to begin. The energy needed to start a chemical reaction is called activation energy. Activation energy is like the push a child needs to start going down a playground slide. The push gives the child enough energy to start moving, but once she starts, she keeps moving without being pushed again. Why do all chemical reactions need energy to get started?

In order for reactions to begin, reactant molecules must bump into each other, so they must be moving, and movement requires energy. When reactant molecules bump together, they may repel each other because of intermolecular forces pushing them apart.

Overcoming these forces so the molecules can come together and react also takes energy. The video below explains an experiment you can try at home which demonstrates an exothermic reaction. Slow Burn These old iron chains give off a small amount of heat as they rust.

What Is a Chemical Reaction? Chemical Equations Chemical reactions can be represented by chemical equations. Role of Energy in Chemical Reactions Matter rusting or burning are common examples of chemical changes. Exergonic Reactions A chemical reaction that releases energy is called an exergonic reaction.

Endergonic Reactions A chemical reaction that absorbs energy is called an endergonic reaction. Activation Energy All chemical reactions need energy to get started.

Notice that the reactants hare at a higher energy level than the products; so this reaction releases energy overall. But the reaction consumes energy to get started - this is the activation energy for the reaction. Review What is a chemical reaction? Identify reactants and products in a chemical reaction. List three examples of common changes that involve chemical reactions.

Define a chemical bond. What is a chemical equation? Give an example. Our cells use glucose C 6 H 12 O 6 to obtain energy in a chemical reaction called cellular respiration. In this reaction, six oxygen molecules O 2 react with one glucose molecule. Answer the following questions about this reaction. How many oxygen atoms are in one molecule of glucose? Write out what the reactant side of this equation would look like. How many oxygen atoms are in the reactants in total? Explain how you calculated your answer.

How many oxygen atoms are in the products in total? Is it possible to answer this question without knowing what the products are? Why or why not? How many molecules of carbon dioxide CO 2 are produced in this reaction? Is the evaporation of liquid water into water vapor a chemical reaction? Why or why not Why do bonds break in the reactants during a chemical reaction? Contrast endergonic and exergonic chemical reactions.

Give an example of each. Define activation energy. Explain why all chemical reactions require activation energy. In which type of reaction is heat added to the reactants? In which type of reaction is heat produced? If there was no heat energy added to an endothermic reaction, would that reaction occur? If there was no heat energy added to an exothermic reaction, would that reaction occur?

Explain why a chemical cold pack feels cold when activated. Explain how the sun indirectly gives our cells energy. Watch the video below to learn more about activation energy.

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